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It can be as simple as doing the dishes

Over a decade ago, my father was dying from lung cancer. I was a single mom, running a consulting business and now making numerous trips to the hospital with him for chemotherapy treatments and spending nights at his house during hospice care. Needless to say, it was emotionally and physically exhausting and left me little time to tend to every day matters like grocery shopping and house cleaning. One night I arrived home late from a recent visit with my dad, to find my kitchen spotless. A dear friend (who’s mother had died from cancer a few years earlier) and her boyfriend had taken it upon themselves to do the dishes. So simple, and yet so profound. I have never forgotten that sweet, simple gesture.

[Photo credit: peapod labs/flickr]

Shelagh Gordon’s kindness was powerful. She was the kind of person who would buy a lottery ticket — not hundreds, but one — and immediately write a list of names to whom she could divide the winnings.
At 55, Shelagh died suddenly of a massive brain aneurysm. At a glance, her name was just another name in the obituaries, but something stood out to Catherine Porter, a journalist at the Toronto Star. So she explored deeper. What emerged, was an extraordinary portrait of an ordinary person told through the perspectives of the family and friends Shelagh had left behind.
[Listen on Kind World]

Shelagh Gordon’s kindness was powerful. She was the kind of person who would buy a lottery ticket — not hundreds, but one — and immediately write a list of names to whom she could divide the winnings.

At 55, Shelagh died suddenly of a massive brain aneurysm. At a glance, her name was just another name in the obituaries, but something stood out to Catherine Porter, a journalist at the Toronto Star. So she explored deeper. What emerged, was an extraordinary portrait of an ordinary person told through the perspectives of the family and friends Shelagh had left behind.

[Listen on Kind World]

User Submission: Duck Tape for Camille

In January 2013 Camille was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in her right tibia, a rare bone cancer. Ten years old at the time, she had been a competitive Irish step dancer and in a matter of weeks, she went from a dance floor to an oncology floor. Because of many complications, she has been hospitalized over 10 times and is currently receiving chemotherapy. During this difficult time, Camille has kept the most positive, creative spirit. She is especially fond of making things out of Duck Tape. She collects the most wild colors and patterns and fashions wallets, key holders, eyeglass cases, the works. Her pieces are precise, functional, fun and very artistic. 

Even with insurance, the costs that attend her treatment, surgeries, check-ups and care are staggering for her mom. Last month, her dance school, the O’Shea-Chaplin Academy of Irish Dance, held a fundraiser for Camille and her family. It was called the “We’re Sticking With You, Camille” campaign and it featured rolls of Duck Tape! Contributors could purchase tape for themselves and/or donate a roll to Camille. One hundred percent of the proceeds was given directly to Camille’s family, along with dozens of rolls of crazily colorful tape for her next projects. 

Letters For Scotty: Reddit Sends Its Love For Terminally Ill Man
Scott Widak spent all 47 years of his life in his hometown of Plainville, Massachusetts, living with his mother and surrounded by his family.
He was a guy with some especially unique hobbies. He loved WWF wrestling, classic movies, and receiving mail. So when he became terminally ill, his nephew, Sean O’Connor, took to Reddit, asking the online community to send letters to his Down Syndrome uncle and listing some of his uncle’s interests. The response Sean got was beyond anything he imagined, and became a source of great comfort to Scott and the whole family in his last days.
[Listen on Kind World]

Letters For Scotty: Reddit Sends Its Love For Terminally Ill Man

Scott Widak spent all 47 years of his life in his hometown of Plainville, Massachusetts, living with his mother and surrounded by his family.

He was a guy with some especially unique hobbies. He loved WWF wrestling, classic movies, and receiving mail. So when he became terminally ill, his nephew, Sean O’Connor, took to Reddit, asking the online community to send letters to his Down Syndrome uncle and listing some of his uncle’s interests. The response Sean got was beyond anything he imagined, and became a source of great comfort to Scott and the whole family in his last days.

[Listen on Kind World]